prettybitpopple:

redraw of a robot baby i did a few years ago!

prettybitpopple:

redraw of a robot baby i did a few years ago!

(via rotting)

@1 hour ago with 36 notes
zannaka:

PLOMP @ Artereal Gallery Louise Zhang

zannaka:

PLOMP @ Artereal Gallery Louise Zhang

(Source: zannaka, via rotting)

@3 hours ago with 38222 notes
100artistsbook:

Detail of Pietro Magno
More male art at www.TheArtOfMan.net and www.VitruvianLens.com 

100artistsbook:

Detail of Pietro Magno

More male art at www.TheArtOfMan.net and www.VitruvianLens.com 

(Source: 0ueen, via malebeautyinart)

@5 hours ago with 216 notes
centuriespast:

Inauguration of the New Buiding of la Benedictine, July 1900
Frédéric Charles de Vernon, French, 1858 - 1912
1900
Silver
Philadelphia Museum of Art

centuriespast:

Inauguration of the New Buiding of la Benedictine, July 1900

Frédéric Charles de Vernon, French, 1858 - 1912

1900

Silver

Philadelphia Museum of Art

@7 hours ago with 128 notes
explore-blog:

How to make your own luck
@8 hours ago with 840 notes

cressus:

     No one before Bernini had managed to make marble so carnal. In his nimble hands it would flatter and stream, quiver and sweat. His figures weep and shout, their torses twist and run, and arch themselves in spasms of intense sensation. He could, like an alchemist, change one material into another - marble into trees, leaves, hair, and, of course, flesh.  
     -   Simon Schama’s Power of Art. Bernini

(via themindofaconservator)

@1 day ago with 136720 notes
ancientpeoples:

Painted terracotta head from a statue of a worshipper
From the Sanctuary of Apollo at Phrangissa, Tamassos, Cyprusc. 600 BC
This head is in true Cypriot style with an Assyrian type beard, wide open eyes, a severe expression and prominent nose. A number of other male heads have Assyrian style beards like this one - hardly surprising as Cyprus was under Assyrian control from about 707-612 BC. The tallest of these large-scale terracotta statues discovered so far measures 260 cm in height and comes from the same site as this head: the Sanctuary of Apollo at Phrangissa, Tamassos on the island of Cyprus.
The first large-scale statues of terracotta in Cypriot style are recorded from the island of Samos in the middle of the seventh century BC. They were first produced in Cyprus in the later seventh century BC. The statues continued to be made into the sixth century, though production had ceased by about 550 BC when sculpture in stone became more popular. The city of Salamis may have led the way in the creation and diffusion of this terracotta art to other parts of the island, but finds from the site at Tamassos are impressive.
All Cypriot large-scale terracotta statues were assembled from several separate pieces made by different techniques. Bodies were thrown on a potter’s wheel; those of larger figures were made in two parts and assembled after firing. Legs were hollow and either handmade or made of clay coils; sometimes legs were wheel-made. Arms were either handmade and solid or wheel-made and hollow. Heads were normally hollow and turned on a wheel or made of coils; the faces were moulded. Accessories such as jewellery and beards were added and facial features formed. The figure was painted as required before being fired.
Source: British Museum

ancientpeoples:

Painted terracotta head from a statue of a worshipper

From the Sanctuary of Apollo at Phrangissa, Tamassos, Cyprus
c. 600 BC

This head is in true Cypriot style with an Assyrian type beard, wide open eyes, a severe expression and prominent nose. A number of other male heads have Assyrian style beards like this one - hardly surprising as Cyprus was under Assyrian control from about 707-612 BC. The tallest of these large-scale terracotta statues discovered so far measures 260 cm in height and comes from the same site as this head: the Sanctuary of Apollo at Phrangissa, Tamassos on the island of Cyprus.

The first large-scale statues of terracotta in Cypriot style are recorded from the island of Samos in the middle of the seventh century BC. They were first produced in Cyprus in the later seventh century BC. The statues continued to be made into the sixth century, though production had ceased by about 550 BC when sculpture in stone became more popular. The city of Salamis may have led the way in the creation and diffusion of this terracotta art to other parts of the island, but finds from the site at Tamassos are impressive.

All Cypriot large-scale terracotta statues were assembled from several separate pieces made by different techniques. Bodies were thrown on a potter’s wheel; those of larger figures were made in two parts and assembled after firing. Legs were hollow and either handmade or made of clay coils; sometimes legs were wheel-made. Arms were either handmade and solid or wheel-made and hollow. Heads were normally hollow and turned on a wheel or made of coils; the faces were moulded. Accessories such as jewellery and beards were added and facial features formed. The figure was painted as required before being fired.

Source: British Museum

@1 day ago with 183 notes
blazepress:

The floor of Florence Cathedral. 

blazepress:

The floor of Florence Cathedral. 

(via shrugging)

@1 day ago with 2948 notes

ryanschude:

Miniature sets built, lit, and photographed by Lori Nix

(via violentferns)

@2 hours ago with 134 notes
1bohemian:

photobooth in 1953.

1bohemian:

photobooth in 1953.

(Source: vintageeveryday, via confessionsofamichaelstipe)

@4 hours ago with 41292 notes
@6 hours ago with 838 notes

(Source: meetthepugs, via antlersout)

@8 hours ago with 94582 notes

(Source: ricktimus, via katieourmatie)

@1 day ago with 83596 notes
livingundersexualthirst:

make sure to check the amazing photographer: 
http://romainlecam.blogspot.it 

livingundersexualthirst:

make sure to check the amazing photographer: 

http://romainlecam.blogspot.it 

@1 day ago with 142 notes
ryanpfluger:

zak, 2014

ryanpfluger:

zak, 2014

@1 day ago with 144 notes